CSTCM DAOM Program and Curriculum Overview

Program Overview

The CSTCM DAOM program is an advanced practice doctoral program in Chinese Medicine from the classical texts with a focus on clinical application. It provides in-depth theory and practice in acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, and integrative medicine.

Length:          24-months, 1,215 hours, 53.5 credits
Structure:      6 trimesters, 3 weekend modules per trimester with weekly online classes between weekend modules
Location:       CSTCM, central Denver

Curriculum Overview

The CSTCM DAOM program is an advanced practice doctoral program in Chinese Medicine from the classical texts with a focus on clinical application. It provides in-depth theory and practice in acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, and integrative medicine. The curriculum of 1,215 hours (53.5 credits) includes 450 didactic hours of classroom instruction and 765 clinical hours. The intensive clinical focus and the in-depth study of the classics ensure a vital education and application of Chinese medicine from the classics.

The program curriculum is structured to be completed in two calendar years/6 trimesters. In the first year, each trimester has 3 weekends on campus. Each weekend is Friday through Monday. In the second year, trimesters 4 and 5 have 3 weekends on campus. Each weekend Saturday through Monday and trimester 6 has 3 weekends on campus. Each weekend includes Saturday and Sunday. Between each weekend module, there are weekly online classes that all DAOM students must attend. (Please refer to the Academic Calendar on page 14 for more details)

The academic curriculum is structured to provide a well-balanced learning experience of the Chinese medical classics, includes fundamental principles and significant techniques from the Huang Di Nei Jing (Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine), Nan Jing (The Huang Emperor’s Canon of Eighty-One Difficult Issues), Shennong Bencaojing (The Divine Farmer’s Classic of Materia Medica), and ShangHan Lun (Treatise on Cold Damage Diseases).

In year 1, students learn fundamental theories, diagnosis, needle techniques, and treatment plans based on the Ling Shu classical text. In year 2, students study the Huang Di Nei Jing, Nanjing and Shang Han Lun and begin to apply the theory to develop the treatment plan which they learned in year 1.

The 765 hours of clinical training is an effective combination of clinical observation (30 hours), clinical internship (120 hours), clinical externship (495 hours), clinic forums (105 hours), and clinical pedagogy (15 hours). All clinical courses emphasize the clinical application of Chinese medicine from the classics.

For the 495 hours of mentored clinical externship, students will work in their clinic in agreement with the externship requirements, including working with a DAOM program externship mentor and reporting all externship treatments on the DAOM clinical treatment reports. Externs will also provide CSTCM with a signed externship agreement with proof of current LAc and appropriate insurance.

The intensive clinical focus and the in-depth study of the classics ensure a vital education and application of the DAOM specialization of Chinese medicine for the classics.

Students will complete a clinical research study paper, or “capstone project,” during the course of their second year and present it to the Faculty Committee prior to graduation. The written research report will be based on data gathered by students in the course of their clinical work and augmented by a review of applicable research literature.

Research Project

The doctoral program’s Capstone Project provides students the opportunity to research a topic, problem, or issue within their field of study, and work individually with a Capstone advisor. Similar to a thesis, but more flexible, the Capstone project will synthesize and apply core concepts acquired from the program. Students demonstrate their abilities to utilize the theoretical and practical/clinical aspects of doctoral education, critically evaluate research and potentially contribute to the research base of Chinese medicine and enhance competencies of professional communication. A Capstone Proposal must be approved by both the Capstone Advisor and the Research Director. The student will be assigned a Capstone advisor who is knowledgeable in the field of study to work closely with and who can guide the research project. Evaluation will be focused on the quality and professionalism of applied research and writing; critical and creative thinking; problem-solving skills; knowledge of research design, method, and implementation; and contribution to the field and topic of study. The faculty committee will review and evaluate the following:

1) the research interest, ethical issues, and methods of addressing each in the research;

2) data gathering methods;

3) progress toward completion,

4) CCM theory, diagnosis, treatment,

5) quote from the CCM text, and

6) final project content, format, and delivery.

Research proposals should be no longer than 3,000 words (excluding the reference list/bibliography).

For More Information, please refer to the DAOM Catalog or contact the DAOM Dean at: daom@cstcm.edu, or fill in the inquiry form.

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